Acerca de

22 Daybreak.jpg

Exhibitions and Outreach

The creation of traveling exhibits is closely tied to art-based outreach projects in line with our mission to build community engagement. We initiate hands-on learning and performance around exhibit themes, as demonstrated with the first showing of Icons and Symbols of the Borderland at the Centennial Museum. We collaborated with Wise Latina International and UTEP Women’s and Gender Studies for artist visits and a performance by Danza Azteca Omecoatl; with OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute) to produce a student exhibit, Border Visions; and with UTEP Upward Bound and the El Paso Boys and Girls Club to offer giant puppet-making workshops tied to social and environmental issues. At the exhibit’s showing in Austin, the Mexic-Arte Museum hosted a Borderland Unlocked Panel Discussion (sponsored by Texas Humanities) with Community Altars exhibition and Viva la Vida festival and parade. With the showings at the City of San Antonio Centro de Artes and the Brownsville Museum of Fine Art, we kicked off the Save the Wildlife Art and Ecology Project, an interactive installation and off-the-wall performance that invited full engagement. The art on the walls spurred alliances for raising awareness of the natural world with mask making and dance that celebrate the border region’s native and endangered species. In 2018 the Amarillo Museum of Art hosted the show and artist talks in the Texas Panhandle. In this way the borderland is portrayed in a wide range of voices that blend indigenous myth, religious tradition, history, and activism with pop art.

The Crossroads Art and Ecology Lab is supported by the Fulcrum Fund, a grant program of 516 ARTS made possible by the Frederick Hammersley Foundation.